Phylogenetic approaches for studying diversification

 

tree-of-life

Hélène Morlon. Ecology Letters 17(4):508-525. Phylogenetic approaches for studying diversification


Lynsey McInnes

Lynsey McInnes

We wanted to do a ‘classic’ diversification paper this week, but realised we’d quickly keep referencing the explosion of literature on the subject from the last five years or so, so we cheated a little and decided on Morlon’s review, because here she has summarised it all for us. A difficult paper to critique, so we’ll use it as a jumping off point for our own personal diversification-related pet favourites.

I have a few! First, I am still wavering whether it will ever be possible to have a unified, tractable model of diversification that spans a large chunk of the tree of life. I can’t decide whether it is an honourable aim to go looking for one (with all the necessary heterogeneity of drivers) or whether a better approach would be really trying to look for some objective way to delimit a ‘homogeneous’ clade and then do comparative/meta-analytical analyses on stacks of them (see Aelys Humphreys’ paper for a step in this direction). Models are always simplified versions of what actually happened, so perhaps it is enough to get a ‘good enough’ model that describes diversification and it doesn’t matter to our pattern seeking minds that one pesky species came to be because of a different process to all of its closest relatives. As you can see, I’m still on the fence.

Second, I really think that diversification modelling that incorporates biotic drivers (e.g. among competitors or across trophic levels, etc.) is simply really cool. It is a difficult challenge to (as above) work at a relevant spatial or taxonomic scale and to not overshoot the importance of biotic interactions vs. other drivers, but if we can manage to do this, at least for some clades, I would be satisfied. While the grand aim of incorporating more ecology into diversification analyses is a great one, its really hard to do this in a more than superficial way. I think really unravelling how biotic interactions impact diversification of a focal group will go some way to rectifying this deficit. It is hard as a pattern seeking macro person to incorporate the idiosyncracies of ecological processes, we must try harder!

Lastly, and predictably, I think if we ever want to understand diversification at the broadest scale, treating species as homogeneous units is too simplistic and models that acknowledge that most species consist of multiple populations distributed across a heterogeneous landscape and connected to greater or lesser extents will ultimately provide better insights into how new species form and old species go extinct. But you knew I would say that.


Will Pearse

Will Pearse

This is a fantastic review, and pulls an awful lot of thinking about ecology and evolution into a single paper. Lynsey’s too nice to mention this, but the expressed intention of the paper (“integration of research in ecology and macroevolution“) cites her paper that came out of a symposium she organised with Ally Phillimore; go watch all the videos now please because they’re great and fit with this paper very well.

It’s a testament to how far the evolution of diversity has come that this review has been published in Ecology Letters – many of these models are remarkably ecological, or at the very least they’re trying to be. Morlon points out we have a need for a Holy Grail that links observed ecological mechanism with evolutionary process – this is precisely the kind of thing I’m trying to do right now, and it’s hard. It’s telling that many of the more exciting kinds of models that she describes haven’t been coded up to be tested with empirical data. In many cases that’s because the actual process of model-fitting is too intense, but maybe in others it’s because many of these models ignore what’s going on elsewhere in a phylogeny. Species are often assumed to be interacting only with members of their own clade, and there’s no attempt to take into account what traits other distantly-related species have, presumably because to do so makes everything unidentifiable. Sadly, such situations reflect reality; for my fifty cents, that’s why I think the meta-community models Morlon discusses are our best bet, because they attempt to model groups of species interacting (and are now incorporating trait evolution).

It is tempting to go off on a mini-rant about whether we can actually detect extinction rates from molecular phylogenies. Morlon gives a good summary of this debate, and she’s both more optimistic and knowledgeable than I so I’ll make a more general, phylogenetic comment about all this. I was struck, when going through her types of models, that while some to me seem to me approaches (“look at an LTT plot!”; fig. 2d) and others seem conceptual ideas (“look at how traits change!”; fig. 2c), none of them are mutually exclusive. I don’t think I’m saying anything controversial: each model is an attempt to capture one particular of something that we all know to be important in a way that a particular author thinks they can quantify well. We all agree that ecological differentiation, geographical separation, and every other of these factors determine diversification rates. The problem is, none of them are accounted for when we build the phylogenies which, themselves, go on to determine our estimates of diversification. Until we create an integrated way of building a phylogeny that takes into account where those sequences came from, the geographical history of the clades that determined them, and the traits of those species, we’re sunk. If you can write a model that can do all that (some have started), then I’d love to hear from you!…

Advertisements

About will.pearse
Ecology / evolutionary biologist

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: