A Neutral Theory for Interpreting Correlations between Species and Genetic Diversity in Communities

Laroche et al. The American Naturalist 185(1): 59-69. A Neutral Theory for Interpreting Correlations between Species and Genetic Diversity in Communities

Figure 4 from Laroche et al. The Species-Genetic Diversity Correlation plotted against mutation rate (m) and carrying capacity (K). Personally, I (Will) think it looks a bit like a scene from Interstellar if you squint a little. That's not a comment on the science; I just really enjoyed Interstellar.

Figure 4 from Laroche et al. The Species-Genetic Diversity Correlation plotted against mutation rate (m) and carrying capacity (K). Ignore the white splodges; they’re unimportant for our purposes. Hopefully we’ve just nerd-sniped you into reading the paper!


Lynsey McInnes

Lynsey Bunnefeld

Oh the dangers of picking a paper because you like the keywords and finding them cooked in a different way to you had imagined in your head. I have a slow-burning interest in how thinking about intraspecific variation can help explain interspecific patterns of diversity, turnover, etc, and this paper’s keywords fall right into that gap…

Here, the authors are interested in understanding why you often find, or expect to find, positive correlations between genetic diversity of a focal species and species diversity in the same area (i.e., not quite the same thing). They elegantly explain accepted thinking on the effects of local competition and connectivity and size of sites in a metacommunity as being the factors underlying these expected/often observed patterns.

The paper is concerned with adding the omitted factor of mutation ‘regime’ into the mix. If mutation occurs at the same rate as migration among sites, the expected correlation between genetic and species diversity could break down. I’m not going to lie, the way the authors get to this outcome remains somewhat opaque to me. My general understanding is that when mutation rate is high, the impact of migration among sites is less predictable as there will be a greater variance in what amount of diversity is transferred among sites and this leads to unpredictable knock-on effects on genetic diversity-species diversity patterns. How, you might ask, how indeed?

What I did like about this paper, probably because it harks back to what I liked about the keywords is the incorporation of more actual genetics into the model. Mutation regime is a necessary addition to thinking about genetic diversity and, as the authors rightly point out it is going to be easier (and at the same time much more complicated) to deal with as genomic data pours in. We appear to be on the cusp of understanding how these different levels of diversity impact each other and it’s mega exciting! Models such as this one are pretty awesome, and set the stage for the next step which would be incorporating mutation rate heterogeneity, including at selected loci. Population genetics has the machinery to deal with this variation, we just might need a bit more crosstalk with ecologists and theoretical biologists to get to more refined characterisations of patterns (if there are any) at the macro scale.


Will Pearse

Maybe this is off-topic, but I was dreading reading this paper because these sorts of analyses terrify me. I wasn’t familiar with the ‘ODD model‘ of describing biological models, but the authors use it to such excellent effect that my fears were completely unfounded. If you’re a theoretical person, please use this approach!

This is a paper about within-species diversity (community genetics, not community phylogenetics), and so almost by definition they cannot examine speciation processes. However, I was left wondering how speciation would interact with these dynamics; I assume it’s tricky to model because otherwise a ‘smart’ thing for a genotype to do would be to speciate and thus avoid competition with the genotypes it left behind. Perhaps you’d end up moving to a more coalsecent-esque model in which individuals’ competition strengths are a function of time since coalescence – species identity itself would be something a bit arbitrary. I’m interested because I think there are so many parallels with this model and the more Neutral Theory models (and some of the models of fitness we’ve discussed in the past). I wonder what the dynamics would look like if you just shunted some of these dynamics inside a classic Neutral model.

Presumably this sort of literature applies only to neutral alleles – if there is an allele that confers a selective advantage, then natural selection et al. kick in. Which is where I was wondering how competition steps into this framework – I think it’s at the step where new individuals are drawn (please correct me!), in which case I can see how migration and mutation rates would affect what we find. On another side-note, I particularly liked that the authors had worked sampling into their model – it made it a lot easier to draw this back to what would be expected empirically, and helped the authors make sense of how such empirical results seem to disagree with this model at first. More of this as well, please!

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About will.pearse
Ecology / evolutionary biologist

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