Ecosystem restoration strengthens pollination network resilience and function

Kaiser-Bunbury et al. 2017. Ecosystem restoration strengthens pollination network resilience and function. Nature 542,223–227

Figure 1 from the paper. The island of Mahé with study sites and pollination networks (for more details see the paper itself).


Kat Raines

I chose this article as it merges my past and present research areas. I currently work in radioecology, focussing specifically on pollinators in Chernobyl but previously I worked for three years in the Seychelles archipelago on invasive species projects focussing on everything from plants to mammals. I thought this paper looked interesting (although slightly out of my research field) and attempted to answer some of the big questions relating to ecosystem restoration in response to the removal of invasive species.

The aim of this paper by Kaiser-Bunbury et al. is to examine whether ecosystem restoration through the clearing of invasive plant species affects pollination networks. This study was undertaken as a community field experiment on the island of Mahé, Seychelles. The Seychelles archipelago is ideal to conduct invasive species projects as it is relatively isolated from other islands and main land Africa and Mahé offers mid altitude inselbergs as discrete sites from which 8 were selected for this study. Half the inselberg sites were cleared of invasive species and therefore referred to as restored and compared to sites that had not been restored. They found that restoration markedly changed pollinator numbers, behaviour, performance and network structure.

The authors noted that the removal of dense thickets from the restored sites could have had an effect and we wondered exactly how much this would affect pollinator’s ability to even see flowers and whether it was then appropriate comparing sites with dense vegetation to sites with a greater number of clear areas therefore increasing the visibility of flowers.

This study found that interactions in restored networks were more generalised and therefore indicate higher functional redundancy therefore making these networks more robust. This concept was a main point in the discussion for the group as we debated whether it was better to have a high number of specialised pollinators or whether it was better to be more generalised and to what extent this matters on an isolated island with a high number of endemic species. It has been shown that specialist species suffer from habitat loss the most and tend to go extinct first whereas more generalised species are more robust therefore increasing the ecosystem’s resilience. We also wondered if these findings could be extrapolated and applied to other regions and habitats as increased pollinator interaction is obviously a very important outcome for ecosystem restoration.

In conclusion we enjoyed the paper and were impressed with the amount of effort that went into data collection for the plant-pollinator networks. Ecosystem restoration is a powerful tool in conservation but it is relatively unknown what the effects of restoration are on ecosystem functions so this paper is a notable addition to that knowledge base.

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